Quantum Computing: IBM launches first-ever 1,000-qubit chip: What it means for tech industry, scientists and more



There is a lot happening in the chip industry as companies race to one-up competition in the next generation of tech advancements. While there is a lot of focus on AI chips, IBM has unveiled the first quantum computer with more than 1,000 qubits.
For years, IBM has been following a quantum-computing road map, and according to the company, it will now shift focus on making its machines more error-resistant rather than larger.Called Condor, the newquantum computing chip has 1,121 superconducting qubits arranged in a honeycomb pattern.
What are Quantum chips
Quantum chips power quantum computers that are used to perform certain computations that classical computers cannot. These chips can easily handle problems that supercomputers are believed to take hundreds or thousands of years to solve.
The company has also unveiled a chip called Heron that has a record-low error rate – five times lower than that of its previous quantum processor. IBM Quantum systems can serve as a scientific tool to explore utility-scale classes of problems in chemistry, physics and materials.
“The IBM Heron is the first in IBM’s new class of performant processors with significantly improved error rates, offering a five-times improvement over the previous best records set by the IBM Eagle,” IBM said.
Additional IBM Heron processors will join the company’s utility-scale fleet of systems over the course of the next year, it announced.
IBM Quantum System Two
IBM also unveiled IBM Quantum System Two, the company’s first modular quantum computer and IBM’s quantum-centric supercomputing architecture. It is 15-feet tall and operates in a near perfect vacuum at a temperature colder than deep space.
It is a scalable solution, which means it can be upgraded with chips that the company is planning to launch in the next 5 years. The first IBM Quantum System Two is located in Yorktown Heights, New York and it has begun operations with three IBM Heron processors and supporting control electronics.




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